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Sunday, May 10, 2015

They remembered their son as humble, silly and soft spoken. He could fix almost anything and loved animals, his siblings and being a grandson. "He was different, but he still was like any other teenager -- wanted to explore different things, do different things, be around different people," McSpadden said. "He's young. He's growing up. He's finding himself." 'He's a murderer' Brown's father didn't mince words when he spoke about Wilson: "He's a murderer." "He understood his actions. He understood exactly what he was doing. You know, he didn't have a second thought, a pushback thought, or nothing. He was intending to kill someone. That's how I look at it," Brown said. "He was going to kill someone at that point." Earlier, he'd said the grand jury's decision changed his view of America. "I was upset. I didn't understand," Brown said in a conversation with the Rev. Al Sharpton on Tuesday on MSNBC. "It just let me know that where we live is not what we thought, or what I thought. It's what people have been saying all the time, for a nice little minute: that this was a racist state." Sharpton accused Prosecutor Robert McCulloch of trying to disparage Michael Brown Jr. He asked Michael Brown Sr. how he felt about the prosecutor attacking "the character of the victim."

Free MacBook Pro 17 inch i7 2014 McSpadden's husband, her son's stepfather, wrapped her in his arms before turning to the crowd, screaming: "Burn this bitch down." Ferguson prosecutor faces backlash Mike Brown Sr.: Darren Wilson 'a murderer' Police spray tear gas on protesters "He just spoke out of anger. It's one thing to speak and it's a different thing to act. He did not act. He just spoke out of anger," McSpadden said about her husband, Louis Head. Michael Brown's parents speak out to CNN "When you're that hurt and the system has did you this wrong, you may say some things as well. We've all spoke out of anger before," she told CNN. Both McSpadden and Brown's father, Michael Brown Sr., sat down with Hostin. Neither believes Wilson's version of events, saying their son would never have taunted the officer, nor reached for his weapon. They remembered their son as humble, silly and soft spoken. He could fix almost anything and loved animals, his siblings and being a grandson. "He was different, but he still was like any other teenager -- wanted to explore different things, do different things, be around different people," McSpadden said. "He's young. He's growing up. He's finding himself." 'He's a murderer' Brown's father didn't mince words when he spoke about Wilson: "He's a murderer." "He understood his actions. He understood exactly what he was doing. You know, he didn't have a second thought, a pushback thought, or nothing. He was intending to kill someone. That's how I look at it," Brown said. "He was going to kill someone at that point." Earlier, he'd said the grand jury's decision changed his view of America. "I was upset. I didn't understand," Brown said in a conversation with the Rev. Al Sharpton on Tuesday on MSNBC. "It just let me know that where we live is not what we thought, or what I thought. It's what people have been saying all the time, for a nice little minute: that this was a racist state." Sharpton accused Prosecutor Robert McCulloch of trying to disparage Michael Brown Jr. He asked Michael Brown Sr. how he felt about the prosecutor attacking "the character of the victim." "They crucified his character," Brown said. In a news conference Monday night announcing the grand jury's decision, McCulloch extended his "deepest sympathies" to the Brown family and referred to the "tragic death." He said the grand jury's decision was based on evidence and facts, some of which contradicted people who said they witnessed Officer Darren Wilson shooting Michael Brown Jr. McCulloch had long promised a fair and complete presentation. "We will be presenting absolutely everything to this grand jury," he told a radio program in August. "Every statement that a witness made, every witness, every photograph, every piece of physical evidence. Absolutely nothing will be left out." Transcript of prosecutor's news conference Documents released by the prosecutor's office show that witnesses gave differing accounts. Should a special prosecutor have been appointed? Experts disagree over whether McCulloch should have stepped aside and let a special prosecutor handle the case. His father, a police officer, was killed on the job by an African-American man in 1964, when McCulloch was 12. HLN legal analyst Joey Jackson said Wednesday that while there can be discussions about the possibility of bias as a result of his father's death, there is a more fundamental reason he should not have taken the case: the close relationship prosecutors often have with their local police. "You rely upon the police every day" as a prosecutor, Jackson said on CNN's "New Day." "You give them your support, your resources. They give those resources back to you." CNN legal analyst Paul Callan disagreed with the reasoning. A prosecutor should not be disqualified "because he's worked with the cops closely in the past. I would say, 'You know something? He's a guy with integrity, I'll trust his investigation.'" "I think the grand jury reached the right result on the facts of this case," Callan said. Still, "you have to have public confidence in the result." If the public did not have faith in McCulloch because of his father's killing, then "maybe because of the level of public distrust, we should have had a special prosecutor," Callan said. The family of Michael Brown, the black teenager shot dead by a policeman, say they are "crushed" by the grand jury's decision not to charge Darren Wilson. Mr Brown's father told NBC news his son's character had been "crucified". Separately, Mr Brown's mother said Mr Wilson had been "disrespectful". Mr Wilson, who shot dead Mr Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August, has told US media he has a "clean conscience". There were protests over the ruling in 13 US cities on Tuesday night. In Ferguson, there was some unrest as protesters scuffled with police, and a police car outside the town hall was set alight. However, police said security was "much better" than Monday, when there was widespread rioting and looting, and more than a dozen buildings were set alight. About 2,000 National Guard troops were deployed in the city on Tuesday night, up from 700 on Monday. Forty-four people were arrested. Missouri governor Jay Nixon said the "ramped up presence" of the National Guard had been "helpful", and that he would monitor the situation to see if more resources were needed. 'Shame, shame' Rallies in the area continued on Wednesday, as at least 200 protesters gathered outside St Louis City Hall, holding a mock trial for Mr Wilson. Some demonstrators stormed the hall, shouting "shame, shame", and forcing police to lockdown the building, AP news agency reported. Two people were reportedly arrested. Video has surfaced out of Ferguson, Missouri showing a brief but tense impasse that ends with a mask-clad looter standing down to a female pizza shop employee as nearby businesses burn to the ground. Monday evening’s announcement that a grand jury has declined to indict Ferguson, MO police officer Darren Wilson with any charges related to the August shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, has rekindled mass unrest in the small Missouri town and other locales across the United State. Dozens have been arrested already in Ferguson during the course of the two nights since the jury’s decision was released, and a myriad of businesses throughout the town of around 21,000 have been looted, set ablaze or otherwise ravaged by outraged protesters, the likes of which, according to officials, has surpassed even the worst of events that unfolded in the days after Brown was first killed in broad daylight. Now as video of the fiery protests on the streets of Ferguson are uploaded to the web, dramatic footage has appeared showing a strained standoff between woman working for a Papa John’s pizzeria and an irate looter. Blogger Victor Maggio captured the incident and uploaded it to YouTube on Tuesday this week, where it was quickly viewed more than 80,000 times in a matter of hours. From only a few feet away, Maggio watched and recorded as a woman described by the Daily Mail as a Papa John’s manager gestures a masked looter away from her establishment after he repeatedly tries to kick in the business’s window. Soon the masked man is joined by another looter and a shouting match ensues between the two and the pizzeria employee, but Maggio continues to record long enough to watch the woman deflect their attempts to cause further damage to the restaurant. After nearly a minute of the heated exchange, the two looters walk away. “[T]his damage was inflicted on people’s lively hoods that had nothing to do with the shooting of Mike Brown,” Maggio wrote on his website. “[G]unshots sound off through the whole video, and individuals took aim in the direction of police and reporters.” According to the Daily Mail, the Ferguson Papa John’s was looted back in August during a series of protests that followed Brown’s death. “What I've seen tonight is probably much worse than the worst night we ever had in August, and that's truly unfortunate,” St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar said early Tuesday morning, hours after it was finally revealed that Wilson, 28, will not face charges at this time for the death of Brown. Later in the day, Ferguson Mayor James Knowles blamed the previous evening’s destruction partially on the National Guard’s failure to provide help, despite Missouri Governor Jay Nixon having already activated the group week earlier. In response, Gov. Nixon said Tuesday that more than 2,200 members of the Guard have now been called up to the region. Benjamin Crump, an attorney for the Brown family, said Tuesday afternoon that he objects to what he called a faulty investigation into the teen’s death. They,remembered,their,son,as,humble,silly,and,soft,spoken,He,could,fix,almost,anything,and,loved,animals Information about the Illuminati click here

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